magnify

Eric Karr Photography - BUS: 806.773.7605 | SMS: 806.445.2335

Lubbock's Premier Photographer - Family / Children / Seniors / School / Fashion / Glamor / Sports

formats

Break it down: iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

Published on April 2, 2016 by in News

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

Taking apart a camera isn't for the faint of heart, but if you've chosen to do so you don't have to go alone. Our friends at iFixit publish disassembly guides to empower owners of electronic devices to make some fixes themselves. And who hasn't wanted to see what's underneath the plastic shell of Canon's top-of-the-line compact camera? Take a look at what lies beneath the surface of the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II.

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

As always, the first and most important step – remove the battery from the camera. 


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

With the battery safely set aside, you're free to go about the business of taking your camera apart. 


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

After removing the screws on the left, right and bottom of the camera, there are four more to remove under the flip-up LCD.


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

Now that those pesky screws are out of the way, the back panel comes right off, though be sure to disconnect the ribbon cable attaching it to the body before pulling too hard.


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

Unsurprisingly there are additional screws to remove, this time for this copper plate (possibly used to dissipate heat). Underneath that there's yet another plate, this one silver.


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

With those plates off there are three ribbon cables to remove with your trusty spudger.


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

After removing a screw behind the pop-up flash and another on the front just below the Canon logo, you can 'pop the top' on the G1 X Mark II.


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

Once you're removed even more screws, you can spudge the left side of the camera right off.


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

Finally, after much spudging of ribbon cables, you can remove the front panel of the camera. The round thing toward the right is the G1 X II's speaker.


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

Two screws must go in order to remove the metal plate surrounding the I/O ports. There are ports for HDMI and USB output as well as a wired remote.


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

With the back and side plates of the camera removed, the time has come to take off the front panel...


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

... and the lens has been liberated from the rest of the camera. That's the capacitor for the flash on the right - definitely not something you want to handle.


All images courtesy of iFixit

iFixit disassembles the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark II

After the removal of countless screws and ribbon cables, here's Canon's flaghsip compact camera, the PowerShot G1 X Mark II, in pieces.


All images courtesy of iFixit

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

New normal: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 samples & first impressions

Published on April 1, 2016 by in News

Sony recently updated its FE line, which now offers 16 full-frame lenses for Sony's E-mount Alpha cameras (not counting 3rd party options like the Zeiss Batis line, or Sony's wide/tele converters). Among the new lens introductions is the FE 50mm F1.8, what you might call Sony's 'nifty fifty'. We spent some time shooting with it in San Francisco this weekend, paired with the unforgiving 42MP of the Alpha 7R II. Click on the image above and see how the lens holds up in our real-world samples gallery, and have a read of some of our initial thoughts, after the break, below.


Initial impressions

We were definitely pleased to see a lower cost full-frame FE lens from Sony - particularly a fast one. The Sony/Zeiss FE 55mm F1.8 retails for $998, and although it's incredibly sharp and quick to focus, the cost may put off potential buyers. The new FE 50mm retails for a much more affordable $249.99. The lower price point does mean some tradeoffs, of course. Let's take a look at some of them below.

Optically Sony's new normal is a variant of the traditional double Gauss design. In fact, it appears very similar to the Canon 50mm F1.8 II design.

MTF performance graphs, however, indicate the lens should be sharper than the Canon's 50mm F1.8 II (the MTF curves for the new 50mm STM are, for the most part, almost identical to the Mark II) wide open, particularly in the center. Sharpness and contrast appear very impressive across the entire frame by F8.

Just don't expect Sony/Zeiss FE 55mm F1.8 levels of sharpness, which is able to maintain both contrast and resolution across the frame wide open considerably better than the new FE 50mm (Zeiss chooses to show 20 and 40 lp/mm performance as opposed to 30 lp/mm performance for the FE 55mm, but you can imagine 30 lp/mm as a trace in between the green and blue curves below). Astigmatism is also very well controlled in the FE 55mm.

There are some compromises when it comes to the FE 50mm lens focus-wise. It features a unit focus design with a DC motor, a first for a Sony FE lens, according to Sony engineers. Unfortunately, this does mean slower AF speeds and non-silent performance compared to Sony's linear actuator and Direct Drive SSM lenses (to be fair though, those lenses set a very high bar). On the other hand, Sony assures us that the unit focus design allowed them to achieve higher optical performance than they might have achieved with a smaller focus element - for this price point and size, anyway. 

One thing in particular we should call out is that this particular lens does not open up its iris during AF acquisition (on an a7R II, and probably all other bodies), which means that focus speeds get slower and slower the more you stop down. Sometimes at smaller apertures in challenging light, focus can fail altogether, working again if you revert to a wider shooting aperture. This aperture dependence of focus is unfortunate, and somewhat crippling in some scenarios, sometimes forcing you to dial in F1.8, focus, switch to MF, then stop down and shoot - cumbersome and seemingly unnecessary. Sony says this is intentional design to avoid the extra time it takes to open up the aperture during AF acquisition. But frankly, the slower AF speeds from trying to focus stopped down may be more crippling.

For its price point and size, the aforementioned trade-offs are certainly understandable, and many will appreciate the availability of a low-cost fast prime for the popular Alpha E-mount series. The lens is incredibly sharp by F4, and wide open performance is still very respectable centrally, and will appear even more so mounted to a more forgiving, lower resolution a7 camera. Sharpness and contrast can suffer peripherally wide open at 42MP (seen as a dreamy haloing of subjects near edges), but things sharpen up quickly as you stop down. And to be fair, 42MP. We do hope, though, that the stopped-down focusing results are improved via firmware changes that at least allow the option of forcing the lens to focus wide open, and only stop down to take the picture, if not simply make this the default behavior.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

This Automated Method For Colorizing Black-and-White Photos Is Very Impressive

Published on April 1, 2016 by in News
automatically colorize black and white photos

Surprisingly natural-looking results from an automated process

Researchers at UC Berkeley have developed an effective method for automatically "colorizing" black-and-white photos

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Along the coast: Sony FE 24-70 F2.8 GM real-world samples gallery updated

Published on April 1, 2016 by in News

With Springtime finally kicking in to high gear on the West Coast, we took advantage of the change in weather and brought the Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 GM lens along with us on a couple of trips. From razor-clamming in Long Beach, WA to pounding the streets (and stairs) of San Francisco, the 24-70 G Master continued to impress us in terms of sharpness, out-of-focus rendering and overall build quality. This class of lens is a staple in many professionals' and advanced amateurs' kits; to see if it's worthy of earning a spot in yours, take a look through our updated samples gallery below.

Note: with each pair of images, the first will be processed to taste from Raw, and the second will be straight-out-of-camera. Both will have the original, uncompressed Raw file associated with them for download. 

Please do not reproduce any of these images on a website or any newsletter / magazine without prior permission (see our copyright page). We make the originals available for private users to download to their own machines for personal examination or printing, we do so in good faith, please don't abuse it.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Ilford Photo announces ordering program for unusual sizes of sheet film

Published on March 31, 2016 by in News

UK film manufacturer Harman Technologies has announced that orders are being taken for unusual sheet and roll film sizes in its annual program for supplying low volume and custom-sized Ilford Photo materials for vintage and large format camera owners. Rather than making odd sizes on the chance that they will sell, the company uses it Ultra Large Format (ULF) program to collect orders from the public and institutions through specified retailers and sets aside time especially to produce film to fit old cameras.

The company offers these odd sizes in Ilford FP4 Plus, HP5 Plus and Delta 100 Professional black and white emulsions. Sheet materials as large as 20 x 24in. and as small as 2.25 x 3.25in. are on offer, as well as roll film in 46mm (127 film) and 70mm widths. Sheet sized film is also available in rolls for users to cut themselves, and can be ordered in widths of up to 20in (x 50ft). Some sizes have no minimum order volumes and can be ordered as a single box.

For information on which films and sizes are available, and through which retailers, see the Ilford Ultra Large Format information sheet (pdf). Orders must be placed by Friday 27th May 2016.


Press release:

ILFORD PHOTO ULF, CUSTOM & SPECIALIST FILM MANUFACTURE 2016

Buoyed by the fantastic response from the film photography community around the world, HARMAN technology Limited are delighted to be offering film photographers the opportunity to place orders for a range of specialist film products for the 11th consecutive year.

With the continued revival in film photography, it is vital to have film available for photographers using ultra large format alongside previously popular film formats for antique and collectable cameras.

By consolidating orders HARMAN technology can supply products that would not normally be viable to manufacture.

“This program enables us to further support the world of film photography that uses and values our conventional products” said Giles Branthwaite, Director of Sales and Marketing at Harman technology. “Through running the ULF program each year, we are able to satisfy the strong demand for specialist film formats. Whilst manufacture is not easy, we have been rewarded by increased demand year on year ensuring we will continue to address and care for this market.”

Films available for this year are ILFORD FP4 PLUS, HP5 PLUS, and DELTA 100 PROFESSIONAL. Not all films are available in all formats.

For a full list of the 2016 items and participating dealers visit:
http://www.ilfordphoto.com/ulf

The options available reflect what has been asked for over the past 10 years. HARMAN is happy to consider any other size suggestions but do not guarantee to make them available.
For sheet sizes an order for just one single box can be made, but for roll sizes this is not possible due to potentially excessive waste. Please see the minimums and multiples required next to the appropriate roll size.

Note:
Orders must be placed with the listed ULF reseller partners no later than Friday 27th May.

The UK factory will start to ship orders to Distributors during August and end users should check with the local ULF reseller for expected arrival dates.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Best of both worlds? Canon patent for DSLR hybrid viewfinder design published

Published on March 31, 2016 by in News

Canon has applied for a patent for a viewfinder design that combines both optical and electronic displays in a DSLR style system. Via a system of mirrored prism the design allows users to benefit from all the advantages of both EVF and TTL optical systems through the same eye piece. Menus can be overlaid on a normal optical view, or a live view function can be used through the viewfinder – which would be of great benefit to video shooters.

In Canon's new hybrid viewfinder design light passes through the lens as usual and is reflected through a ground glass screen into the pentaprism. As it exits the pentaprism is can be supplemented with light from a LCD panel (labelled '9') that is projected through a series of lenses and bounced from a half-mirror (6b) and on to a reflective surface (6). The two sources of light combine and pass to the photographer's eye via the eye piece (8). When the mirror is in the up position the image recorded by the sensor (12) can be sent directly to the LCD panel (9) so the photographer can get a live view of what the sensor is recording. Thus the system combines the best elements of electronic and optical viewfinders.

Through a clever use of optics and a mirrored prism, the new design allows a 'full screen' display across the whole viewfinder. The significance of the system is that DSLRs will be able to gain some of the advantages of mirrorless systems, such as full menus and playback in the viewfinder, and shooting information could be shown across the larger screen instead of just the bottom or sides of the screen. This would also make possible video shooting through the viewfinder, which could become important if technologies like Dual Pixel AF start to replace secondary-sensor PDAF systems. This would eliminate the need to switch between viewfinder and rear screen shooting to change from stills to video mode, creating a more consistent experience.

The system allows menus to be viewed and accessed as they are overlaid on the image produced by the optical finder

The patent description explains that one of the challenges has been to ensure that the image projected from the electronic screen matches that of the optical system, which is why the screen has been placed close to the viewfinder instead of before the prism, where there might have been more room. Being on the viewing side of the prism means less magnification is needed to create an image big enough to coincide with that of the optical view.

The projection system uses a complex set of lenses to reduce the size of the construction so that the manufacturer shouldn’t have to make physically larger cameras to accommodate it. Canon also indicated that it has taken steps to reduce the impact of the half mirror that has been placed in the optical path. It says that the angle of the mirror is optimized to allow as much light to pass as possible.

The heads-up display type viewing system is nothing new, and although it has been discussed in camera circles before we have yet to see a good example of technology combining optical and electronic views. The closest we have come is the hybrid viewfinders used by Fujifilm in the X-Pro and X100 series of cameras, but Canon's method is the first to combine an EVF with a TLL viewfinder, rather than a more rangefinder-style arrangement.

Canon’s patent was applied for in 2014 and the information only just published, so the company may be in a position to introduce the system quite soon. However, as with any patent there's a chance nothing will come of it, no matter how good an idea it is. We will just have to wait and see what, if anything, comes of it.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Nikon D5 real-world low light, high ISO samples

Published on March 31, 2016 by in News

Nikon's new flagship DSLR, the D5, has landed and it offers some serious high ISO reach. Natively, you can push the camera all the way to ISO 102,400 and in extended settings it goes all the way up to the 3 million mark. We've already seen what it looks like in the studio, so to put the camera's low light capabilities to the test in the real world we brought the D5 with us to the Crocodile, a much-loved Seattle concert venue, followed by a late night stroll through the cherry blossom-lined streets of the Emerald City's Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Please note, we've indicated which images are straight out of camera and which are Raw conversions (with ACR edits noted). We'll be updating with daylight shots for a full sample gallery soon.

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

The Fotodiox WonderPana FreeArc XL Filter System Is Built for the Massive Canon 11-24mm Zoom Lens

Published on March 31, 2016 by in News

A really big lens requires some really, really big filters

Want to use some glass filters with the massive Canon 11-24mm F/4L zoom lens? Try the Fotodiox WonderPana FreeArc XL

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Seagate Innov8 8 TB Hard Drive Ditches the Dedicated Power Cord

Published on March 31, 2016 by in News
Seagate Innov8 USB-Powered Drive

This slick-looking drive makes use of USB-C

This USB-C powered drive doesn't need a power cord and has 8 TB of storage

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn
formats

Eric Karr Photography – Model – Rachel Zahn – Makeup Artist – Lindsay Stroope.

Published on March 31, 2016 by in Fashion

erickarrphoto03312016-1aaa

 
 Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Reddit Share on LinkedIn