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Watch This: A Short Documentary About Wet Plate Photographer David Rambow

Published on May 12, 2016 by in News
Wet Plate Photography

This photographer keeps an old process alive

Photographer David Rambow embraces the slow process of wet plate photography…
 
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EyeEm launches The Roll for iOS, an intelligent take on your Camera Roll

Published on May 12, 2016 by in News

If you’re an iPhone owner, you know one thing about the beloved Camera Roll: it can get messy. While it seeks to bring some order to the chaos with built-in dating and geotagging, it doesn’t help high-volume shooters zero in on specific content or locate their best shots from multitudes of thumbnails.

EyeEm, the global community and photography marketplace, is here to help with today’s release of The Roll, an app that uses a proprietary image recognition algorithm to classify, tag, keyword and select your best photos. In addition to its organizational function, the app also displays metadata such as aperture, ISO, geolocation and more.

When launched, The Roll examines each of your photos for content and then groups similar shots together, whether or not they were taken on the same day or in the same place (and ignoring all of those screenshots living on your phone). Then, it classifies and tags photos under broad searchable categories like Pets, Water, Fun, Cute, or a predominant color or location, placing the best shot on top. The same photos or groups can appear under different headings. Within each broad classification are smaller subgroups of similar photos of varying quality that you can choose to keep or delete in order to save room on your device or to immediately share with others.

The app’s keywording and scoring functionality are based on EyeEm Vision, the company’s server-based computer vision tech. Powered by deep learning technology, photos are assigned an Aesthetic Score from 1 to 100 percent that seeks to replicate how professional photographers and curators judge a composition.

Each photo also features a multitude of keywords, which are derived from a shot’s content and an artificial intelligence algorithm’s judgment of the photo’s mood and emotion. The algorithm can identify thousands of concepts to help you search for photos in your catalog. EyeEm assures privacy to all users and promises that all synced photos are deleted after scoring and keywording.

The app contains all the information you need to understand how it works, though there is no further analysis on why one cat picture may score 10 points more or less than another taken at the same time or place — though scrolling through each selection often makes the rational for the score more obvious. I did not necessarily agree with all of The Roll’s judgments about my images, of course, but it provides a starting point if a user is in a quandary about what to immediately share or delete.

The Roll is not the first to come up with automatic sorting and keywording: Google Photos and Flickr’s Magic View already do that. The Roll also did not move at lightning speed through my relatively small collection, which is typically filled with screenshots. Its real value is having a reliable analysis of resident images and an assist in deciding what is immediately sharable.

The Roll is offered free of charge and while it only runs on iOS 9 or later for now, an Android version is in the works.

 
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You Can Do It: Create Abstract Light Patterns In Photos Using LEDs

Published on May 12, 2016 by in News

Rotate your LED strips to play around with composition

How to create abstract images using LED strips and a little creativity…
 
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Samsung unveils 256GB EVO Plus microSD card

Published on May 12, 2016 by in News

Samsung has introduced the EVO Plus 256GB UHS-1 Class 10 microSD card. According to Samsung, the new EVO Plus card has the highest capacity in its class, and is able to hold up to 12 hours of UHD video, 33 hours of Full HD video and up to 55,200 photographs.

The Samsung EVO Plus 256GB microSD card offers write speeds up to 90MB/s and read speeds up to 95MB/s, as well as the maker’s ‘4-Proof’ durability — it is magnet-proof, temperature-proof, waterproof, and x-ray-proof. A 10-year limited warranty accompanies the durability promises.

Samsung will launch its new storage card in the U.S., Europe, China and beyond (totaling 50+ countries) next month for $249.99.

Via: Samsung

 
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Sigma offers part replacement to prevent lenses scratching Pentax K-1

Published on May 12, 2016 by in News

Lens manufacturer Sigma has announced that it will replace parts on its Pentax-mount lenses that are known to scratch the new Pentax K-1 full-frame camera. The company says that certain lenses that it produces clash with the shape of the upper part of the mount on the K-1 and that using one of the listed lenses ‘could leave a small scratch on part of the camera body’.

Sigma has issued a list of current and past lenses that it knows create a problem, and advises Pentax K-1 owners not to use them until the repair is carried out. Three current lenses are included in the advisory: the 30mm F1.4 DC HSM Art, 35mm F1.4 DG HSM Art and APO 50-500mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM. A time scale for the repair service to begin has yet to be announced though.

The company also says that some of its lenses are not recognized automatically by the K-1, and that users will need to manually enter whether the lens is designed for full frame or APS-C sensors via the camera’s menu system. The announcement makes no mention of whether this issue will also be fixed.


Press release:

Use of Pentax mount SIGMA interchangeable lenses when attached to the Pentax K-1

Thank you for purchasing and using our products.

We have found that some SIGMA interchangeable lenses for Pentax mount could leave a small scratch on part of the camera body when they are attached to the PENTAX K-1, released by RICOH IMAGING COMPANY, LTD. on April 28th, 2016. In this circumstance, please do not use the following lenses for Pentax mount on the PENTAX K-1.

We are planning to provide a repair service to replace a part of the lens for this issue. We will make a further announcement on our website when specific details, such as the service period, are finalized.

In addition, please also refer to the usage notice related to this announcement below.

Phenomenon
When some SIGMA interchangeable lenses for Pentax mount are attached to the PENTAX K-1, the upper part of the mount can be scratched.

This phenomenon is due to the interference with the shape of the upper part of the mount on the PENTAX K-1 camera body and it does not occur to any cameras other than PENTAX K-1.

Applicable products
Current Line-Up

  • 30mm F1.4 DC HSM| Art
  • 35mm F1.4 DG HSM| Art
  • APO 50-500mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM

Discontinued Lenses

  • 50mm F1.4 EX DG HSM
  • 85mm F1.4 EX DG HSM
  • 24-70mm F2.8 IF EX DG HSM
  • APO 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM
  • APO 70-200mm F2.8 II EX DG MACRO HSM
  • APO 50-150mm F2.8 II EX DC HSM
  • APO 120-400mm F4.5-5.6 DG OS HSM
  • APO 150-500mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM

Usage Notice for customers who are using Pentax mount SIGMA lenses on a PENTAX K-1
In some cases, depending on the lenses to be attached on the camera, the angle-of-view cannot be recognized automatically. Please select an angle-of-view that is appropriate for the lenses to be attached from “Crop” in the camera’s menu.

When DG lenses are attached, please select “FF”.
When DC lenses are attached, please select “APS-C”.

We appreciate your continued support for our company and products.

 
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Benchmark performance: Nikon D810 in-depth review

Published on May 12, 2016 by in News

I’m pleased to announce that our in-depth review of the D810 is now published. A lot of you will be asking why it took so long. That’s a good question. There’s no single, simple answer, but believe us when we say that over the past two years there has rarely been a day when we have not been working on the D810 review in some way or other.

As we started to dig deeper and deeper into things like its class-leading dynamic range, its 3D tracking autofocus and numerous other details, we realized that not only did we have to revisit some of our existing testing methods, but that to properly test a camera like this we had a responsibility to create entire new tests.

You’ve seen the results of those new testing methods in our reviews of other major cameras like the Sony a7R II and Canon EOS 5DS/R. When we started looking into shutter-induced vibrations at certain shutter speeds for example, we had to devote a lot of time to tedious repeated testing of several cameras, not just the D810, to figure out what was going on. We did that because we don’t like guessing. Because when we suspect that a certain camera (or class of camera) displays a behavioral quirk that photographers should know about, we like to be able to prove it.

This process of evolving old tests and developing new ones is ongoing. Ironically, none of our recent reviews of major new flagship cameras could have been written to the standard that they were without some of the tests we developed when working on the D810.  We’re just very sorry that it took so long before we could show you our workings. 

And with that – we hope you enjoy the review!

 
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2016 Roundup: Consumer Long Zoom Compacts

Published on May 12, 2016 by in News

Bridge and travel zoom cameras are two of the very few categories of compact cameras to survive the smartphone. Whether it’s a travel zoom, which puts a 25X-30X zoom into your pocket, or a bridge camera which offers even more zoom, phones just can’t compete. 

While there are now enthusiast-level long zoom cameras with 1″-type sensors – such as Sony’s Cyber-shot RX10 series – there are still plenty of more budget-friendly models, though their smaller sensors don’t offer the image quality or depth-of-field control of the pricier models. The one product in the group that is a bit more competitive with the enthusiast cameras is the Olympus Stylus 1s, which has a 1/1.7″ sensor, rather than the smaller, and more common (in this class) 1/2.3″.

The following cameras are included in our roundup:

Of those eight cameras, three are pocket-sized and offer 30X zooms. The other five are bridge (SLR-style) cameras with focal lengths ranging from 600mm to an unbelievable 2000mm (35mm-equivalent).

And with that, let’s take a look at some consumer-level travel zoom cameras!

 
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Canon announces patent infringement complaints in Brazil

 
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Care & Nickel

Published on May 11, 2016 by in Portraits

CaraHorse05112016-1sm

 
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Corel AfterShot Pro 3 launches with new touchup tool, recovery algorithm

Published on May 11, 2016 by in News

Corel has launched AfterShot Pro 3, the latest version of its photo editing software. The newest version brings several added features and updates, including a Lens Correction Development Kit for creating custom lens corrections, an in-app plugin manager, and a few new and improved tools for touching up photos.

AfterShot Pro 3 is equipped with a completely new Highlight Recovery algorithm, and as such Corel claims the Highlight Recovery Range slider can pull more tones and details from overexposed Raw photos. Joining the new algorithm is the addition of ‘comprehensive watermarking,’ including the ability to watermark in batches, rotate the watermark’s angle, adjust its size, and alter its transparency. 

Another new editing tool is Blemish Removal & Correction, which aims to eliminate the need to use a separate app like Photoshop to remove blemishes and perform other touchups and small corrections. Photo presets can also be applied via the new in-app preset library; both premium and free presets are offered.

Finally, AfterShot Pro 3 features a new modular delivery system for providing updated and new Raw profiles more quickly than the previous software version. With this, new camera profiles are available to download in-app as soon as they’re released by the company’s development team.

Corel AfterShot Pro 3 is available in English, German and Japanese through the product’s website; Windows, Mac and Linux are supported. The price for new customers is $79.99 USD/CAD, while existing customers can upgrade to the newest version for $59.99 USD/CAD.

Via: MarketWired

 
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