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Eric Karr Photography - BUS: 806.773.7605 | SMS: 806.445.2335

Lubbock's Premier Photographer - Family / Children / Seniors / School / Fashion / Glamor / Sports

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Fotodiox introduces extra large WonderPana Free Arc system for Canon EF 11-24mm wide zoom

Published on March 30, 2016 by in News

US accessory manufacturer Fotodiox has announced an XL version of its WonderPana Free Arc filter system for wide angle lenses that it says is designed specifically to allow users of the Canon EF 11-24mm F4L USM lens to use filters over the front element. The Canon super-wide zoom has no filter thread of its own and the front element is heavily convex, so fitting filters in the traditional way is impossible. The WonderPana Free Arc system positions a filter holder over the front of the lens that takes 186mm screw-in filters and/or 80mm rectangular filter sheets. The holder is enormous so that large filters can be used to avoid vignetting when the lens is used at its widest setting.

The Free Arc clamps the hood of the lens between its collar and the screw-on filter-holding cone, and provides a 186mm thread for the company’s screw-in filters. A set of brackets can also be attached to the cone that allow two square filters to be fitted as well. The system makes it possible to fit one round filter and one square filter at the same time, and the whole filter stage is rotatable so graduated filters can be positioned to suit the subject.

The Fotodiox WonderPana Free Arc XL costs $225.95 and the 183mm filters start at $99.95. For more information visit the Free Arc page on the Fotodiox website.


Wide? Ultra-wide? WonderPana has you covered.

Ultra wide-angle lenses are typically impossible to filter due to their bulbous front lens element, lack of filter threads and potential for severe vignetting. The ALL NEWWonderPana FreeArc XL, however, is the latest in our line of aluminum filter collars that let you to attach our massive 186mm filter options, like ND 4-1000 and circular polarizers, to wide and ultra wide-angle lenses.

Perfect for landscape and architectural photographers and filmmakers, we designed the WonderPana FreeArc XL to suit Canon’s new breed of 11-24mm lens. Durable and lightweight enough for hand-held shooting, it can be ready at a moment’s notice to answer any image challenge that requires filters. You can even keep it installed on your lens as a critical layer of lens protection. Just check out our video below to learn more:

 
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Google Photos for Android updated with non-destructive editing

Published on March 30, 2016 by in News

Google has launched version 1.17 of its Google Photos for Android app and the update brings an important improvement: non-destructive editing. Read more

 
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Blue Earth Alliance presents Collaborations for Cause 2016

Published on March 30, 2016 by in News

Are you in Seattle in April? Come down to the Seattle Downtown Public Library, on Friday April 15th and Saturday April 16th 9 AM-4 PM, and join our friends the Blue Earth Alliance for Collaborations for Cause 2016.

This year’s Collaborations for Cause theme is “Innovations in Visual Storytelling for Impact.” It’s a rare opportunity for visual storytellers, writers, funders, non-profits, corporations and public agencies to join together as peers: to learn new strategies, tools and ideas to leverage the power of story and effect social change. As well as talks and seminars from photographers, filmmakers and activists, attendees can also pay for three one-on-one portfolio review sessions, at the show. Reserve your tickets from the link below.

 
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Cyber-shooting: Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III video overview

Published on March 30, 2016 by in News

Sony's new superzoom may look a lot like its predecessor, but an updated 24-600mm lens makes the Cyber-shot RX10 III a much more versatile camera - in theory. We've been able to spend a bit of time getting to know the camera's new features and putting its long zoom range to work. Take a look at what's new to the RX10 series in our video overview.

 
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First sample images from 20MP Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

Published on March 30, 2016 by in News

DPReview is in San Francisco checking out the new Cyber-shot RX10 III. The RX10 III maintains the ergonomics and key specifications of its predecessor, but incorporates a massive 24-600mm equivalent F2.4-4 lens. We've been doing some shooting with the camera in a range of different situations, and we've created a (JPEG only, for now) gallery. 

 
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Mourn the Loss of Fujifilm’s Much-Loved Instant Film With This Awesome Lapel Pin

Published on March 30, 2016 by in News
Shoot Film Co. fujifilm FP-100C Memorial Pin

Say goodbye to FP-100c in style

Shoot Film Co. has created an awesome tribute pin for Fujifilm's discontinued FP-100c instant film

 
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Flickr may be up for sale as Yahoo Board of Directors looks to shed web properties

Published on March 29, 2016 by in News

The future of Yahoo and its many operations, including the photo sharing behemoth Flickr, is uncertain. According to reports, the company's board is now accepting bids for its web properties, with a deadline of two weeks to submit proposals.

While Yahoo has not specifically said which operations are up for sale, they have given hints to what a new, slimmed-down Yahoo might look like. According to Reuters, if the board's restructure goes through as planned, Yahoo will center around Yahoo Search, Mail and Tumblr, as well as four 'digital content strongholds,' which include News, Sports, Finance and Lifestyle.

This seems to indicate that at least according the company's board, Flickr has no place in the future of Yahoo. But not so fast - there are several other factors at play that could put the kibosh on a sale altogether.

One of these factors is an attempted hostile takeover of Yahoo's board by activist investor Starboard Value. Many shareholders, unhappy with financial results, have run out of patience with the current boards plan to turn Yahoo around. This is where Starboard Value comes in. Last Thursday, they announced their intent to overthrow CEO Marissa Mayer, and presented a list of nine alternative board members to replace the current board at the annual shareholder meeting in June.

If Yahoo is unable to get the ball rolling on sales of its assets before June, there's a chance that a new board will be ushered in, and move the company in a different direction entirely.

On the other hand, more than 40 companies have expressed interest in owning a piece of Yahoo, including Microsoft, Verizon, AT&T, Comcast, Time and many more. Whether or not any of those companies specifically have an interest in Flickr is difficult to say. As of June 2015, Flickr had a formidable 112 million active users. That's not quite the 400 million users Instagram claims to have, but its still a sizable community. For the record, Flickr was first purchased by Yahoo back in 2005, for $25 million.

All the while, Mayer is sticking to her plan for turning around the company, which includes laying off 15 percent of the company's workforce, closing unprofitable ventures, all while spinning off Yahoo's stake in Alibaba Group as well as Yahoo Japan into a separate company.

Needless to say, if you're in the market for a photo sharing site, now's the time to bust out the checkbook and make an offer. We just hope if Flickr does make its way into new hands that it goes to a good home.

Via Reuters and The Associated Press

 
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Hands on: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6

Published on March 29, 2016 by in News

Hands on: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6

Sony's already had a busy year, and it just got even busier with the announcement of an update to its RX10 series and two new FE lenses: the 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6 OSS. We got to take a first look at them at a press event in San Francisco. 

Hands on: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6

The FE 70-300mm F4.5-5.6 is the first full-frame E-mount lens to reach 300mm. It offers SteadyShot stabilization, as evidenced by the OSS on/of switch seen here. 

Hands on: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6

The 70-300mm offers a minimum focus distance of 0.9m/2.9ft, a zoom locking mechanism and dust and moisture resistance. It's fairly compact when used at the wide end...

Hands on: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6

...and extends quite a bit to reach that 300mm mark. For the extremely curious, we noted that the lens maintains its widest F4.5 aperture until the 85mm mark, when F5 becomes the widest option. This changes again at 157mm, at which point it stops down to F5.6.

Hands on: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6

Sony has posted MTF charts for the 70-300mm, and they show that this lens might be a cut above the typical telezoom. The 70-300 will go on sale in May for $1200.

Hands on: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6

And now, something a little different: the Sony FE 50mm F1.8. At $250 it's going to be a much more wallet-friendly option than its 55mm F1.8 Zeiss-branded counterpart.

Hands on: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6

The 50mm features a 7-blade circular aperture and offers a 0.45m/1.45ft minimum focus distance. Sony emphasizes its compact and lightweight design and indeed, the lens weighs in at a svelte 186g/6.6oz.

Hands on: Sony FE 50mm F1.8 and 70-300mm F4.5-5.6

Here's another view of that 7-blade aperture. The lens comprises six elements in five groups, including one aspherical element. Like the 70-300mm, it's expected to ship in May. 

 
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Hands-on with the Sony RX10 III

Published on March 29, 2016 by in News

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

The Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III boasts a 24-600mm equivalent zoom lens, 14fps continuous stills shooting and 4K video capture. We've had the chance to get hands-on with Sony's newest flagship compact camera today for a few hours, and we've put together some first impressions. Click through this slideshow for a closer look at the new Cyber-shot RX10 III.

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

Cosmetically and ergonomically, the RX10 III is a near twin of its predecessor the RX10 II. It feels the same, looks pretty much the same and the key controls are laid out in the same way. The grip has been slightly redesigned (our impression is that it's slightly more comfortable when the lens is zoomed fully, but there's not much in it) but if you've used an RX10 II, the RX10 III will feel immediately familiar.

At just over a kilo (~2.3 pounds) in weight the RX10 III is not not quite as heavy as it looks, and in use (like the RX10 II) it feels solid and well-made. 

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

The RX10 III isn't a particularly 'compact' camera when it's turned off, but once it's turned on and the lens extends, it gets even larger. Here, the camera is shown with its lens zoomed out to 24mm...

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

...and here's what the camera looks like when zoomed in all the way to 600mm. This is a big lens and it takes around 4 seconds to go from 24mm to 600mm. 

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

To help frame your shot with such a long zoom, Sony has provided a 'Zoom Assist' feature that lets you jump back to wider framing so that you can re-find your subject, before releasing the button to jump back to your chosen zoom level.

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

The RX10 III boasts a powerful video feature set, based around 4K capture which samples a 17MP chunk of the sensor then down-scales to 4K, . In theory, this should mean that video quality is pretty darned good, and we'll be posting some samples as soon as we can. 

As we'd expect from a camera with such solid video credentials the RX10 III offers headphone and microphone sockets, as well as HDMI out and USB (2.0). This view also shows the articulating rear screen, folded out. As usual (sadly) for Sony, the screen is a magnet for finger prints and general crud, and isn't touch-sensitive.

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

The RX10 III's built-in flash is (as usual for cameras like this) pretty weedy, but its pop-up mechanism raises it unusually high above the lens axis, which should reduce the risk of red-eye in portraits, and minimize shadowing caused by the massive lens. 

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

The rear control layout of the RX10 III is exactly the same as the RX10 II. Twin control dials (one to the right of the movie button and one around the 4-way controller) allow control over exposure parameters, and a generous rubber thumb grip helps to get a firm hold on the camera. 

The RX10 III's electronic viewfinder is very nice indeed, boasting 2.35 million dots (giving 1024 x 768 pixel resolution).

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

The RX10 III is rated for 420 shots from its supplied NP-FW50 lithium-ion battery, which is a modest increase from the 400 shot rating of the RX10 II (as per CIPA ratings in both cases). For maximum battery life, deactivate the built-in Wi-Fi and NFC when not in use.  

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

One of the things we liked about the RX10 and RX10 II is the physical aperture ring. The RX10 III also boasts two additional rings for focus and zoom - the latter function doubled by a conventional compact camera-style 'W-T' rocker around the shutter release. And note that the shutter button is threaded for a mechanical cable release - a nice touch, and a subtle indication of the RX10 III's high-end positioning. 

Hands-on with Sony Cyber-shot RX10 III

We'll be posting images and video samples from the RX10 III as soon as we can - keep an eye on our homepage!

 
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New Gear: Sony Announces the RX10 III Camera With a 24–600mm Equivalent Lens

Published on March 29, 2016 by in News
Sony RX10 III

Sony’s latest RX10 gets a stacked sensor, 600mm of zoom

Sony has announced a followup to its RX10 II super zoom camera called the RX10 III.

 
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