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Leica launches M-D (Typ 262) digital rangefinder with no rear screen

Published on April 28, 2016 by in News

German camera manufacturer Leica has announced a new M digital rangefinder that has no LCD panel. The Leica M-D (Typ 262) will be almost exactly the same as the existing M (Typ 262) but without a rear screen for reviewing images and working the menu. The company says it has produced a camera with only the ‘essentials of photography’, or ‘Das Wescentliche’, and that it will help photographers concentrate on the important elements of image making rather than getting distracted with the camera functions.

This isn’t the first time Leica has produced a digital M with no rear screen, as the company launched the limited edition M Edition 60 to mark the sixtieth anniversary of its rangefinder camera system. Leica made only 600 of these models, and they sell for about $18,000/£12,000, but the M-D (Typ 262) will be the first full production model without a rear LCD.

This new model will feature the standard 24MP CMOS sensor, will have an ISO range of 200-6400, and will have brass base and top plates. The viewfinder has a magnification of 0.68x and offers bright-frame markings for 35/135mm, 28/90mm and 50/75mm lenses. The body has no traditional red dot as Leica says it wants the camera to be discrete, and the single frame mode uses a particularly quiet shutter cocking system.

Users will have control only of aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings, and the camera records in DNG Raw format only.

The Leica M-D (Typ 262) will go on sale in May with a price of $5995/£4650. The M (Typ 262), which does feature a rear screen, actually costs less, at $5195/£4050, but it doesn’t have the quiet shutter or brass top and bottom plates.

For more information visit the Leica website.


Press release:

Leica M-D: The return of anticipation

New digital Leica rangefinder focuses on the absolute essentials of photography, and excludes an LCD screen
 
Leica Camera has extended its iconic rangefinder camera series with a new model: the Leica M-D (Typ 262). The fifth product in the Leica M range, the Leica M-D joins the Leica M and M-P (Typ 240), the Leica M (Typ 262) and the Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246), offering a greater choice for photographers looking for specific functionality from their rangefinder camera.
 
The Leica M-D is the first serial production model of the digital M family to be made without an LCD monitor screen. The standard location of the screen on the back of the camera is taken by the ISO sensitivity setting dial – one of the few, but essential, features of the camera. Although the Leica M-D embodies the entire range of technical developments perfected over decades for the Leica rangefinder system, it intentionally omits all but the most vital features. Concentrating entirely on the key parameters required for photography: shutter speed, aperture, distance and ISO sensitivity, the Leica M-D focuses the user on the most essential aspect – the picture they are taking – and brings back the anticipation of discovering the results later in the process, as when shooting with film.
 
Jason Heward, managing director, Leica UK, said, “With the exclusion of the ubiquitous LCD screen, photographers must return to the principles of photography when shooting with the Leica M-D: accurate framing and composition, selecting the appropriate parameters and settings, and ensuring that they capture the decisive moment with the thought and consideration that has always been necessary in analogue photography. This unique rangefinder camera also brings back the fascination and expectation associated with film – returning photography to its origins during the capturing process, whilst maintaining the obvious convenience and benefits of digital technology.”
 
Principally, the technical features of the Leica M-D are based on those of the Leica M (Typ 262). As with all other digital Leica M cameras, the Leica M-D (Typ 262) features a high resolution CMOS full-frame sensor, which has been designed exclusively for rangefinder photography, and supports neither video recording nor Live View. Its 24 megapixel resolution delivers exceptional image quality and extreme sensitivity, making it perfect for available light situations. At the same time, the camera’s Maestro processor guarantees fast processing of image data. Exposures are captured exclusively as RAW data in DNG format, enabling photographers to apply the required adjustments in post-processing software.
 
Leica’s focus on ‘Das Wesentliche’ (the essentials of photography) is immediately recognisable in the design of this camera. The Leica M-D expresses purely functional, formal clarity, and features characteristics such as a brass top plate with a ‘step’ at the end, referencing the design of the Leica M9. The Leica ‘red dot’ logo has been omitted from the front of the camera for ultimate discretion.
 
Furthermore, the barely audible shutter of the Leica M-D ensures the camera is inconspicuous when shooting: an invaluable advantage in scenarios where the photographer wishes to remain unobtrusive. As an aid to this, the camera features a shutter cocking system that is particularly quiet in single exposure mode, and enables a shutter release frequency of up to two frames per second. In continuous mode, the Leica M-D has the same sequential shooting speed as its sister model and shoots up to three frames per second.
 
The Leica M-D is available in a black paint finish, and includes a real leather carrying strap in full-grain cowhide.

 
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This Mastin Labs Film Design Might Be The Only Good Photo-Related Novelty T-Shirt

Published on April 28, 2016 by in News
Mastin Film shirt

A classic design dedicated to awesome film stocks

This might be the best photography-related T-shirt ever…
 
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New Gear: Leica M-D Is a Digital Rangefinder Camera With No LCD Screen

Published on April 28, 2016 by in News
Leica M-D Digital Rangefinder Camera With No LCD Screen

A $6,000 camera with no LCD screen? Awesome

The Leica M-D digital rangefinder camera has no screen, no video, and no Live View.
 
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Video: Meet the Nikon D500

Published on April 28, 2016 by in News

It's really here. The wait for the D300's successor has been a long one, but the Nikon D500 has officially arrived. So what does the D500 bring to the freshly-revived flagship APS-C lineup? We break down just what's new and notable in our video overview.

 
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Canon releases results for 1Q 2016

 
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Sony enables XAVC S recording to SDHC card with a7R II and a7S II firmware update

Published on April 27, 2016 by in News

Newly released firmware updates for the Sony a7R II and a7S II enable XAVC S format video recording to SDHC memory cards. Previously, XAVC S format video could only be recorded to an SDXC card. Sony makes a couple of notes on the use of SDHC cards for XAVC S video – any recorded files larger than 4GB will be split into multiple files to comply with a 4GB maximum file size limitation. Cards must also be at least SD Speed Class 10 and UHS Speed Class U1 or faster. Video recorded at 100Mbps or more must use a UHS Speed Class U3 card.

 
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The Canon that can: Canon EOS 80D Review

Published on April 27, 2016 by in News

The Canon EOS 80D is an enthusiast-level DSLR, and the successor to the 70D. It sports a new 24MP APS-C CMOS sensor which, like the 70D, offers Canon's Dual Pixel on-sensor phase-detection autofocus system. The 80D also gains a new 45-point hybrid AF system with all of the points being cross-type. This is a step up from the 19-point AF system in the 70D, though not quite at the same level as the 65-point coverage offered by the more professionally-oriented 7D Mark II.

Featuring a body sealed against dust and moisture, the 80D has a polycarbonate exterior and magnesium alloy chassis. It is nearly identical in design to its predecessor, with the majority of controls accessible via the articulating rear touchscreen, as well as via physical control points. Video is a major part of the 80D's total package. While it cannot shoot 4K, it does offer 1080/60p capture and continuous autofocus during video. A headphone socket has been added to compliment its microphone port.

Canon EOS 80D key features:

  • 24MP AP-C CMOS sensor with Dual Pixel AF
  • 45-point AF system with all cross-type points
  • 3" 1.04M-dot articulating touchscreen
  • 1080/60p video capture
  • 7 fps continuous shooting with AF
  • Weather-sealed body
  • 7560-pixel RGB+IR Metering Sensor
  • Wi-Fi + NFC

Other improvements come in the form of a new mirror vibration control system (similar to the 5DS and 7D Mark II), which should help reduce the blur-inducing effects of shutter shock. The 80D also gains the same 7560 pixel RGB+IR metering sensor found in the Rebel T6s and T6i, a serious improvement over the 63-zone dual layer sensor found in the 70D. This new sensor gives the camera some degree of human subject awareness for subject tracking through the viewfinder. However, unlike the 7D Mark II, the 80D does not have Canon's 'Intelligent Tracking and Recognition' (iTR) system, which uses the metering sensor along with distance info to subject track.

The new sensor

It's no secret that some Canon shooters have been frustrated as of late, as Sony's sensor technology marches ahead in terms of dynamic range. Fortunately, the 80D marks a significant step forward in Canon's sensor development, offering much better DR than the 70D or 7D Mark II. But the new sensor isn't interesting just because of the pictures it can capture. Dual Pixel AF not only allows for continuous focus during video capture, but during still capture (in live view mode) as well. We first saw this feature in the Rebel T6s and it is exciting to see it now making its way up Canon's food chain to enthusiast-level cameras.

Compared to its siblings

  Canon EOS 80D Canon EOS 7D Mark II Canon EOS 70D  Canon EOS 6D
Sensor 24MP APS-C 20.2MP APS-C 20.2MP APS-C 20.2MP full-frame
ISO range 100-16000 (expands to 25600)

100-16000
(expands to 25600)

100-12800
(expands to 25600)
100-25600
(expands to 50-102800)
AF (viewfinder) 45 all cross-type points 65 all cross-type points 19 all cross-type points 11 point, center point is cross-type
 AF (Live view/video)  Dual pixel AF  Dual pixel AF  Dual pixel AF Contrast Detect, Phase Detect (in 'Quick' mode)
Intelligent Tracking and Recognition No Yes No No
C-AF in live view during still shooting Yes No No No
 AF joystick  No Yes No No
 Video capabilities 1080/60p 1080/60p 1080/30p 1080/30p
Burst rate 7 fps 10 fps 7 fps 4.5 fps
 LCD spec 3" 1.04M-dot articulating touch LCD  3" 1.04M-dot fixed LCD 3" 1.04M-dot articulating touch LCD 3" 1.04M-dot fixed LCD
 Weight 730 g (1.61 lb) 910g (2.0 lb) 755g (1.7 lb) 770 g (1.70 lb)

Aside from the 70D, the closest sibling to the 80D is the more professionally-oriented Canon EOS 7D Mark II. It uses a slightly lower resolution chip and offers less dynamic range than the 80D. While the two share the same basic video specs, the 7D Mark II is better equipped for fast action, thanks to greater AF point coverage, a dedicated AF joystick and the inclusion of Canon iTR, as well as a faster shooting rate. On the other hand, the 80D's touch focus capabilities make it a more appealing choice for video.

Of course the full frame Canon 6D now falls into a similar price class to the both the 80D and 7D Mark II, making it worthy of consideration. Although it's far from new the 6D remains a solid and popular camera despite its comparatively simplistic AF system.

Accessories

The 80D shown with PZ-E1 Power Zoom Adapter connected to the EF-S 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 IS USM kit zoom. This adapter allows for smooth zooming at variable speeds. 

Along with the announcement of the 80D, Canon announced the DM-E1 shotgun microphone (compatible with any camera that has a 1/8" socket). Canon also announced the PZ-E1 Power Zoom Adapter. It can clip onto the new EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM kit lens and control the zoom, with two speed options. The DM-E1 will sell for $250, while the PZ-E1 will run you $150. Unfortunately, we weren't able to get hold of either new accessory in time for this review, but we'll be updating our impressions as soon as we can. 

Pricing and availability

The Canon EOS 80D is available now for a body-only price of $1199/£999/€1199. Kitted with Canon's new EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM lens, the 80D will run you $1799. Kitted with the EF-S 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 IS STM lens, the 80D will run $1349/£1089.

 
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Base Object 005 Aluminum Camera Stand Is Pretty, Probably Superfluous

Published on April 27, 2016 by in News
Base Object 005 Camera Stand - Aluminum

Class up your work space with a stand for your camera

This $44 aluminum stand keeps your camera off your desk, but looks good doing it…
 
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Canon Powershot G9 X premium digital compact camera awarded prestigious Red Dot international design award

 
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Eric Karr Photography – Alex – Custom Edit.

Published on April 26, 2016 by in Fitness

AlexB-1

 
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