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Eric Karr Photography - BUS: 806.773.7605 | SMS: 806.445.2335

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FlashQ Is Crowdfunding For A Tiny Wireless Flash Trigger System

Published on April 23, 2014 by in News

Help fund an off-camera flash trigger that won’t look out of place on even the tiniest camera

FlashQ is an IndieGoGo fundraising project to build an absolutely tiny flash trigger, one that will work with the vast majority of cameras, but won’t dwarf a small mirrorless or compact camera.

Currently, most flash triggers tend to be relatively sizeable, and on the expensive side. The FlashQ, if it gets sufficiently funded will set you back just $39 for a basic trigger/receiver set ($30 for early birds), and each trigger is able to control up to 8 receivers, at a distance of up to 20 meters.

It’s not the only small flash trigger we’ve ever seen, but compared to even the diminutive (and pricey) MicroSync II, it’s absolutely tiny. While that probably won’t make much of a difference for shooting from a relatively sizeable camera, like a DSLR, for smaller bodies it could mean the world. If you have a compact camera with a hot shoe—maybe a Sony RX100 II, or a Canon G1X II; or even a mirrorless camera, a bulky flash trigger adds a substantial amount of size to your shooting rig. Something like the FlashQ would be tiny enough to throw in a bag, and simply not worry about.

The downside? The FlashQ is relatively basic, but that’s to be expected given the low price and tiny size. The 20 meter range isn’t to be crowed over, it has a maximum sync speed of 1/250s, and doesn’t offer TTL functionality. But perhaps the biggest hurdle is that it still has more than 90% of its funding to raise in the next 26 days in order to succeed.

[via Planet5D]

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Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

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SmugMug Films: Master of illusions

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We’ve been following SmugMug Films’ ongoing behind-the-lens series and have found the clips to be an interesting look at people who follow their passions in photography. The latest installment features Joel Grimes. He’s been a commercial advertising photographer for more than 30 years and is most known for his composite portraits. Grimes considers himself more than a photographer – an artist and illusionist, creating images that are larger than life. See video and read Q&A

 
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Getty To Sell Prints Through New Photos.com Service

Published on April 23, 2014 by in News

Famous Getty Images, mounted and framed for your walls

While Getty Images may now let you embed its images for free, the company has also now started offering a much more premium (and permanent) service, too. You’re now able to purchase real-world prints of famous Getty images through Photos.com by Getty Images.

This newly announced service is a curated set of Getty’s immense collection of photos, which will be printed by New Era Portfolio, and arrive framed and ready to hang on your wall. Prices start at $90, and are available on canvas, archival paper, aluminum, acrylic, and even wood.

The photos themselves cover the usual array of topics that you might want to hang on your wall—nature images, black and whites, geometric shapes. But the most interesting stuff is when Getty starts to tap into some of the more famed images from its archives. The LIFE archive represents thousands of famed images from the selfsame magazine. You can also look through collections from famed photographers such as conflict photojournalist Chris Hondros, music photographer David Redfern, and Hollywood photographer Earl Leaf.

This move into printing is a notable new addition to Getty Image’s services—and obviously a new revenue stream for the organization. It also points to something of a resurgence in the world of photographic prints. Recently, acclaimed street photographer Daniel Arnold made $15,000 selling prints of his Instagram images in just 24 hours. Combine that with easily available print on demand services like the recent Blurb/Amazon partnership, and it’s clear that there’s still a very real appetite for physical copies of images.

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Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

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Drone films SpaceX rocket launch and landing

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These days shots from a flying drone are a dime a dozen – when engagement shoots are being covered from a hovering photographic robot you know that the technology is ubiquitous. It’s getting increasingly hard to impress someone with images or video from drones. So it’s lucky that privately-owned SpaceX happens to own its own rockets because it gives them the ability to capture stunning video, like this launch and landing test of its Falcon 9 Reusable rocket. See video

 
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NYC Department of Records archives showcase city’s history

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You don’t have to be a New Yorker to appreciate the 900,000 plus images available online through the NYC Department of Records archives. Some are photographs of well-known icons like the Statue of Liberty and the Brooklyn Bridge, while others are Wee Gee-esque in their grit or as mundane as photos documenting local school buildings. Many of the images date back to the late 1800s. Learn more

 
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