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What The Duck #1324

We’ve come to the end of another week here at dpreview, and as our thoughts drift to weekend shooting opportunities, it’s time to take things a little less seriously. Aaron Johnson’s comic strip ‘What the Duck’ is just the thing,…

 
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Toshiba unveils UHS-II Class 3 microSD memory cards

Toshiba has announced the industry’s first microSD memory cards to comply with the UHS-II standard. Also being UHS Speed Class 3 (U3) enabled will allow the new cards, available in 64GB and 32GB capacities, to capture 4K video at constant minimum writ…

 
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Flickr Redesigns Mobile App, Adds Video Capture, Editing

Published on April 18, 2014 by in News

Available for both Android and iOS, the Flickr app has been given a totally new look and some new features

Flickr for mobile has just undergone a massive change in look and feel, updating an app that hasn’t seen any refreshing in nearly six months with a radically new design. Now out on both iOS and Android, the new Flickr app also brings a raft of new features.

The most noterworthy of those features is the ability to capture and edit videos—as well as apply the same live filters as exist for still images. Flickr has also radically overhauled its search features for far better response times, as well as enabled a tagging system that can autodetect objects, colors, and scenes. Both of these are fueled by recent acquisitions that Flickr made. And, if you’re viewing a photo on the app, you can now access the full EXIF data, too.

The app launched yesterday morning for Android, then landed on iOS later in the day. At this point, it should be available for all comers—so if you’ve tried the new app, tell us what you think in the comments.

flickr app
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

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Eyefi Launches Cloud Service

Published on April 18, 2014 by in News

Auto-upload your photos to a private cloud service, then access them anywhere, from any device

For years, Eyefi (née Eye-Fi) has offered wirelessly-enabled SD cards, letting you beam photos from just about any camera to a smartphone, tablet, or PC. Now, the company has gone one step further, taking the internet connection on your mobile device, and using it as a bridge to upload your photos to the internet, too. Dubbed Eyefi Cloud, it means that any photo, taken on any device (with an appropriate Eyefi card) will instantly be shared to the Eyefi Cloud, where it can be viewed on any other device.

The new service requires an Eyefi Mobi card, and will cost $49 a year for unlimited photos. New and existing users will get a three month free trial starting on sign-up or download of the new app, respectively. Photos and albums are published privately, but can be shared with individual recipients, or on most major social networks.

If you’re curious about how the service actually works, PCWorld has a good first impressions look at getting it set up—including some notable hiccups with Android devices.

eyefi cloud
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

eyefi cloud

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Eyefi Launches Cloud Service

Published on April 18, 2014 by in News

Auto-upload your photos to a private cloud service, then access them anywhere, from any device

For years, Eyefi (née Eye-Fi) has offered wirelessly-enabled SD cards, letting you beam photos from just about any camera to a smartphone, tablet, or PC. Now, the company has gone one step further, taking the internet connection on your mobile device, and using it as a bridge to upload your photos to the internet, too. Dubbed Eyefi Cloud, it means that any photo, taken on any device (with an appropriate Eyefi card) will instantly be shared to the Eyefi Cloud, where it can be viewed on any other device.

The new service requires an Eyefi Mobi card, and will cost $49 a year for unlimited photos. New and existing users will get a three month free trial starting on sign-up or download of the new app, respectively. Photos and albums are published privately, but can be shared with individual recipients, or on most major social networks.

If you’re curious about how the service actually works, PCWorld has a good first impressions look at getting it set up—including some notable hiccups with Android devices.

eyefi cloud
Photo by: Popular Photography Magazine Editor

eyefi cloud

read more



 
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Olympus Stylus SH-1 real-world samples gallery

The Olympus Stylus SH-1 brings the manufacturer’s well-regarded 5-axis image stabilization to a fixed lens compact for the first time. The SH-1 looks the part too with its Pen-inspired styling, and offers a substantial 25-600mm equivalent zoom. Who co…

 
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