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Researchers Have Figured Out How to Store Digital Photos in DNA

Published on April 8, 2016 by in News
DNA photo storage

Science wants to put your photos in actual DNA snippets

Researchers have figured out how to store digital photo data in DNA snippets…

 
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Crossing the Bridge: Canon XC10 Review

Published on April 8, 2016 by in News

Canon XC10 key features

12 Megapixel 1″ CMOS sensor
DIGIC DV5 image processor
Fixed 10x (24 – 240mm equivalent) zoom lens with image stabilizer
Face Detection/Tracking auto-focus mode
Records 4K XF-AVC UHD (3840 x 2160) video to CFas…

 
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Lee announces very hard neutral density grads for seascapes

Published on April 7, 2016 by in News
Before and after with the Lee Filters Very Hard ND graduated filter

Lee Filters has announced a new range of neutral density graduated filters that have an extra hard transition from dark to clear, making them suitable for shooting seascapes and scenes in which the horizon is very flat. Along with these new ‘very hard’ graduates, the company has launched another range that has a ‘medium’ strength transition that sits between the traditional ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ grades.

Both of the new grades are available in half-stop incremental strengths from one to four stops, and in sizes compatible with the Seven5, 100mm and SW150 systems.
For more information visit the Lee Filters website.

Pricing

Seven5 medium grad (single filter 0.3ND to 0.9ND) RRP £51.88 (excl VAT)
Seven5 medium grad (single filter 1.2 ND) RRP £77.82 (excl VAT)
Seven5 medium grad set (0.3ND, 0.6ND & 0.9ND) RRP £138.35 (excl VAT)
100mm very hard & medium grad (single filter 0.3ND to 0.9ND) RRP £71.86 (excl VAT)
100mm very hard & medium grad (single filter 1.2 ND) RRP £108.86 (excl VAT)
100mm very hard and medium grad sets (0.3ND, 0.6ND & 0.9ND) RRP £179.66 (excl VAT)
SW150 very hard & medium grad (single filter 0.3ND to 0.9ND) RRP £79.70 (excl VAT)
SW150 very hard & medium grad (single filter 1.2 ND) RRP £119.55 (excl VAT)
SW150 very hard & medium grad sets (0.3ND, 0.6ND & 0.9ND) RRP £215.00 (excl VAT)


Press release:

LEE Filters introduces very hard and medium neutral-density graduated filters to its systems

Traditionally, neutral-density graduated filters have been available exclusively in hard and soft versions. However, because all neutral-density grads in the LEE Filters range are made by hand, it is possible to be extremely precise with the depth of the transition between the coated and clear sections of the filter. As a result, LEE Filters has the capabilities to manufacture ND grads in medium and very hard versions. In the past, these were available exclusively as custom-made filters for professional photographers. Now, however, they have been made available to all those who use the Seven5, 100mm and SW150 systems.

The medium and very hard grads not only expand a photographer’s creative options, they also allow for even more exact control when balancing lighter and darker areas of the frame. The very hard grad (available for the 100mm & SW150 systems) is perfect for seascapes that feature a completely flat horizon line, while the medium grad (available for the Seven5, 100mm and SW150 systems) is that perfect ‘in-between’ strength that is ideal for any scene in which an element of the composition – a mountain or a building, for example – protrudes into the sky.

Both ND grads are available in 0.3ND (1 stop), 0.45ND (1½ stops), 0.6ND (2 stops), 0.75ND (2½ stops), 0.9ND (3 stops) and 1.2ND (4 stops) strengths.

For further information, contact LEE Filters on 01264 366245; sales@leefilters.com; www.leefilters.com

 
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New Gear: Hasselblad H6D-100c Camera Is a 100-Megapixel, 4K-Shooting Medium Format Monster

Published on April 7, 2016 by in News
Hasselblad H6D-100c Medium Format Digltal Camera

Lots of megapixels and dynamic range

The Hasselblad H6D-100c Medium Format Digital Camera shoot 100-megapixels stills and 4K raw video…

 
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Huawei Mate S camera review

Published on April 7, 2016 by in News

The Huawei Mate S boasts a 13MP RGBW sensor, an F2.0 lens and optical image stabilization, with a build quality that places it at the premium end of the market. While its spec positions it against the likes of the Samsung Galaxy S6 and LG G4, if y…

 
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Huawei launches P9 and P9 Plus with Leica dual-camera

Published on April 6, 2016 by in News

Huawei has launched the P9 and P9 Plus in London today. The new models jointly replace last year’s P8 and are the first products coming out of Huawei’s collaboration with camera maker Leica. Read more

 
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Kickstarter: Lomography Daguerreotype Achromat 64mm f/2.9 Art Lens Is a Throwback to Photography’s Early Days

Published on April 6, 2016 by in News
Lomography Achromat Daguerreotype Lens

This modern DSLR lens uses a design from the 1830s

The Lomography Daguerreotype Achromat 64mm f/2.9 Art Lens uses a design from the 19th century…

 
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Lexar launches USB 3.0 card reader for XQD storage

Published on April 6, 2016 by in News

Memory card manufacturer Lexar has announced a new card reader for users of XQD format memory cards that uses the USB 3.0 standard. The XQD 2.0 USB 3.0 Reader is designed to be used with XQD 2.0 cards and to move large amounts of data in a short time. Lexar says the reader is particularly aimed at those shooting high quantities of Raw files and those recording 4K video, and claims the built-in USB plug on the reader makes it more portable and easy to use as no cables are required.

The reader is backward compatible with USB 2.0 devices, but obviously with some sacrifice in speed. Theoretically, USB 3.0 devices can transfer data at a rate of up to 640MB/s, which is ten times the theoretical speed of USB 2.0 devices. Currently the fastest read speed for a Lexar XQD card is 400MB/s.

The XQD 2.0 USB 3.0 Reader will cost £29.99/$34.99 when it becomes available at the end of this month.
For more information see the Lexar website.


Press release:

Accelerate workflow with high-speed file transfer

Product highlights

  • Provides professional-level high-speed transfer of RAW images and 4K video files
  • Accelerates workflow, leveraging SuperSpeed USB 3.0 technology
  • Designed for use with XQD™ 2.0 cards
  • Compact, portable design for photographers and videographers on the go
  • Five-year limited warranty

Quickly transfer files on the go with the Lexar Professional XQD 2.0 USB 3.0 Reader. This professional-level, portable USB 3.0 reader easily offloads a large number of RAW images and 4K video from your XQD 2.0 card to your computer at USB 3.0 speeds, accelerating workflow and getting you back behind the camera faster.

Quickly offload RAW images and 4K video. Leveraging SuperSpeed USB 3.0 performance, this small but mighty reader makes it easy to quickly transfer a huge number of large files and speed through post-production. This makes it an excellent choice for professional photographers and videographers—either in the studio or on the go.

Convenient portability. With its compact, portable design, you can slip the reader into your pocket and go. No need to tote a bag or carry cables. Its simple plug-and-play design with USB 3.0 connector makes it easy to quickly offload content—wherever you are. For versatility, it’s backwards compatible with USB 2.0 devices at USB 2.0 speeds.

Rigorously tested. All Lexar product designs undergo extensive testing in the Lexar Quality Labs, facilities with more than 1,100 digital devices, to ensure performance, quality, compatibility, and reliability.

 
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Software Workshop: How to organize your photos with Adobe Bridge

Published on April 6, 2016 by in News

Learn the tips and tricks of managing your photographic life

Learn about all of the new tools in Adobe Bridge, as well as the standard ones to organize your photos…

 
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Lytro CEO confirms exit from consumer photography business, focus on VR

Published on April 5, 2016 by in News

In a recent blog post, Lytro CEO Jason Rosenthal has confirmed that the company is headed out of the consumer imaging business to focus instead on developing a light field virtual reality platform. Rosenthal admits that it was too risky to compete in an established consumer space (that was in decline, no less, thanks to smartphones), and determined the value-add of light field technology to VR would have greater impact. Hence, Lytro has scrapped product development in the consumer camera space.

Says Rosenthal, ‘The cold hard fact was that we were competing in an established industry where the product requirements had been firmly cemented in the minds of consumers by much larger more established companies.’ He also mentions the rise of smartphones and consumer satisfaction with image quality from them.

And ‘while consumer Light Field cameras offered a number of true technological breakthroughs such as interactive 3D pictures, radical lens specs, and the ability to focus a picture after the fact,’ the reality was that there was much more investment Lytro would’ve had to make to its cameras competitive with modern cameras in image quality. Meanwhile, VR companies and Hollywood studios were increasingly asking for light field technology in cinematic and next-gen content. ‘We had just raised $50MM in new capital. We didn’t have the resources to both continue building consumer products and invest in VR.’

Accordingly, in November of last year, Lytro announced Immerge, a 360° light field video capture device, just after announcing plans for layoffs as the company shifted direction toward video and VR. The pro-grade Immerge was a confirmation of this change in focus. It’s currently only a concept camera (co-designed with Seattle-based design firm Artefact, which also designed the Illum), capable of recording live action VR in what Lytro claims as ‘six degrees of freedom’ that, if we understand correctly, should allow for multiple perspectives from multiple angles of view, as well as focus and depth-of-field control after-the-fact. This is a clear benefit for VR capture, which aims to capture as much scene content as possible for the viewer to explore in a virtual environment. 

The decision to shift the company’s focus was not taken lightly. Rosenthal details the anxiety he felt before shifting the company vision, but now says ‘My middle of the night panic attacks are gone. I wake with a burning desire to go to work because I am so excited by what we are building and its potential to help shape VR.’

Shallow depth-of-focus
Extended depth-of-focus

Have a read of Rosenthal’s full blog post here. It’s quite insightful in laying out some of the considerations Lytro has faced as a company. Some of us here are certainly disappointed that Lytro appears to be completely exiting the consumer camera space, as light field technology had a lot of potential in revolutionizing autofocus, in decoupling depth-of-field and light gathering ability, bringing depth-based image editing to the table, and in radical lens design previously thought impossible, thanks to the ability of light field data to perform certain corrections – even image stabilization and simulating faster apertures – after-the-fact as opposed to optically. And that’s just the beginning – every image contained all the information necessary to create 3D images, tilt the image plane, select and customize your depth-of-field (we’ve extended the DOF for our subject, but kept F1.0 background blur in the example above), or capture multiple perspectives which, when paired with light field displays, could one day make for compelling recreations of scenes. That said, many of these benefits will carry over to Lytro’s new direction of focus, and we are very excited to see what Lytro brings to VR and video.

We’ll be following closely. And who knows, perhaps some of the R&D that goes into their new products may find their way back into stills-oriented devices in some form or another. Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

 
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